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Gord Barentsen

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  1. Thanks for this @rhlangan. I haven't read all of Nietzsche and Philosophy, but there is a particularly pithy quote I remember which frames Nietzsche as a thinker of forces, intensities, and potencies. We will never find the sense of something (of a human, a biological or even a physical phenomenon) if we do not know the force which appropriates the thing, which exploits it, which takes possession of it or is expressed in it. [. . .] All force is appropriation, domination, exploitation of a quantity of reality. Even perception, in its divers aspects, is the expression of forces which appropriate nature. That is to say that nature itself has a history. The history of a thing, in general, is the succession of forces which take possession of it and the coexistence of the forces which struggle for possession. The same object, the same phenomenon, changes sense depending on the force which appropriates it. History is the variation of senses. [. . .] Sense is therefore a complex notion; there is always a plurality of senses, a constellation, a complex of successions but also of coexistences.[1] There's obviously a lot to be said here about sense as well, which i think would be a topic unto itself! Footnotes ^ Gilles Deleuze, Nietzsche and Philosophy, 1962, trans. Hugh Tomlinson (New York: Columbia UP, 1983), 4-5; my italics.
  2. I have more I want to say about this response, but right now I'm sitting in Saskatoon International Airport, which is anything but an intellectually stimulating environment. For now, just a personal remark: I used to be against forgetting anything that happened in my life - even if it was painful, at times I would insist on making myself remember, repeat (but perhaps not work through, to use Freud's rubric) painful events in the belief that it would some how benefit me in the future (the perfer et obdura, dolor hic tibi proderit olim approach). But as one gets older, one (in one's wisdom, I would agree with Nietzsche) I have less and less issues with forgetting the painful and traumatic experiences in my life. Maybe that's where meditation is on to something - forgetting the tribulations of consciousness in the name of connecting with a rejuvenating life force (which I wonder wasn't at the heart of The Birth of Tragedy). Source please?
  3. Or maybe questions are answers themselves simply by virtue of pointing to their sheer existence? And it's us who project on to poetry the questions, quests and quotients which concern us at the present moment?
  4. As opposed to apologising for sounding like I'm advertising my dissertation here and there, I'll just say outright that much of what I say is derived in one way or another from my dissertation research. I think it was Haule who wrote an article a while back about how even in his earliest thinking Jung was far more influenced by thinkers in the dissociationist tradition such as Janet and Théodore Flournoy and wasn't nearly as dependent on Freudian "discipleship" as the traditional narrative suggests. Which is not to say that Freud never flirted with what you call the "horizontalism" of the unconscious. I think it wad Adrian Johnston, for all his misunderstandings of Jung, who pointed out an important knot in Freud's thinking on the unconscious - in his essay "The Unconscious" (1915?) Freud says the unconscious is "timeless," but how does this square with the prominence of the Oedipus myth and its insistence on beginnings? Moreover, while I think you're absolutely right to argue that Jung sees myths and symbols in religion, philosophy and literature as more important than Freud, Freud nevertheless puts a myth (Oedipus) arguably at the the center of psychoanalysis (I say "arguably" because the issue of a "centre" of psychoanalysis is a complicated one - would it be the Oedipus myth? The death drive? None of the above? Can the death drive be seen as a "center"?) This is also interesting because by all accounts Freud was a much better writer than Jung...although I would obviously need to know much more German to substantiate this. Regardless, I always enjoy reading Freud's essay on the uncanny for this reason. yeah, Freud got all paternalistic on him at the end, but at the same time there are a couple of moments where he acknowledge some very important influences from Jung. In one amazingly subtle letter, Freud says that Jung says things that Freud would like to say but cannot! The mind only boggles as to what that means... There's a good article by Maria(?) Leitner that discusses the way in which pathology was used by the inner circle of Freudian psychoanalysis to vilify and marginalise its dissenters.
  5. Thanks for this, especially because it made me reread my first post and want to modify the language I used. When I said that the archetype is "a force which has an effect in the natural world" it should always be remembered that there's a crucial paradox in Jung's formulation. Archetpes are producers in the natural world, but equally, and at the same time, they are also products insofar as the infinite nature of the infinite economy of the archetypes hinges precisely on Nature's perpetual evolution and mutation. Which is why there are an infinite number of archetypes, which is why Jung's definition of archetypes in his therapeutics of presence is ultimately arbitrary and can only be arbitrary (or is that arbitrariness a moment within a larger necessary purposive indiviudation process - for Jung or otherwise? The mind boggles ). I think we discussed this after the conference (or after our session had ended), but I can't help but wonder if this has anything to do with the dark precursor as (in my reading of Deleuze anyway) the in-itself of difference, or that philosophical moment where difference is "arrested" (inhibited in Schelling's terms?) into something "less than" difference, but which allows difference to step forward as a concept whereas previously it recedes behind its own work? You also make reference to the "supernatural edge" of synchronicity. Could you explain that?
  6. Gord Barentsen

    Wivenhoe

    A few pics from an evening walk from Colchester to Wivenhoe during my last day in the UK after the Holism conference.
  7. Gord Barentsen

    Housefront, Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    A housefront in Wivenhoe.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  8. Gord Barentsen

    Street, Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    More architecture in Wivenhoe.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  9. Gord Barentsen

    British Flags

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    An argument for "British Power"?

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  10. Gord Barentsen

    Street, Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    A street in Wivenhoe after a thunderstorm.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  11. Gord Barentsen

    Housefront, Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    A traditional housefront in Wivenhoe.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  12. Gord Barentsen

    Houses, Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    More of the beautiful and picturesque houses in Wivenhoe.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  13. From the album: Wivenhoe

    Some of the beautiful houses around Spindrift Way, Wivenhoe.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  14. Gord Barentsen

    The River Colne

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    The River Colne, as seen on the path to Wivenhoe.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  15. Gord Barentsen

    The Path to Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    A particuarly quiet and picturesque stretch of the Wivenhoe path, with overhanging berries.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  16. Gord Barentsen

    The Path to Wivenhoe

    From the album: Wivenhoe

    The walking/riding path from Colchester to Wivenhoe on an overcast, rainy day.

    © 2017 Gord Barentsen

  17. Hey everyone, Just wanted to give a warm welcome to our newest member: @rhlangan, a colleague of mine from the Holism conference who has kindly opted to join our eclectic little circle. rhlangan does work in Jung, Deleuze and Spinoza, and you can find the abstract of his conference paper in the Holism blog abstracts attachment. Welcome again!
  18. "Philosophy, which puts everything into question, is tripped up by poetry, which is the question that eludes it." - Maurice Blanchot
  19. I wonder if there's such a thing as a "You're Wrong Because You're Too Boring To Be Right" argument?
  20. I'm sitting here at the Essex Business School as registration is wrapping up. Just beat a torrential downpour on the way in...what, in England? 😁 I've always loved this country, and not just because of the Romantic poets - friendly people, lots of greenery and a nice temperate climate. I'll post more in the Holism Conference blog tonight (i don't know how some people can write a mile a minute on mobile screens!) - stay tuned in the blog for more!
  21. I forgot to add: if you like, you can update your current location to let people know where you are. Simply change your location back once you get home. I'm at the University of Essex right now, so I've revised my current location on the Map.
  22. Yeah, I wonder if child protection isn't a projected form of self-gratification sometimes....(yeah yeah, I've never had children but still...the way some parents talk about their children.. ) Fewer moving parts, simpler needs...makes sense to me.
  23. Have you ever owned a cat? Like John Constantine says...cats are perfect for interdimensional travel: "they're half in, half out"...
  24. Nope, perfectly legal. I had to sign my dissertation over to the Canadian archives and dissertation repository, but I retain copyright. Besides - anyone can download it for free from Western's repository, so there's no reason why I can't post it here. Stay tuned!
  25. Hi everyone, It's been online for a little while now (as some of you have noticed), but I thought I'd introduce the new Member Map, accessible from the Resources tab in the main menu. Basically, it allows you to show people where you are and provides a geographic distribution of members. Let's make it as global as possible! A couple of brief points: Participation in the Map is entirely optional. Putting your location on the Map can help you connect with other people near you (or who are in places you might want to go someday), but you're under no obligation to do so. Do not provide your full address unless you want it to be made public! You can either give Maps your current location or enter your detailed address information. Enter your home address if you want, but it will be visible to anyone (bot or human) who browses the site. So if you live in Melbourne, simply entering "Melbourne" or a related option from the dynamic menu is fine and will preserve your privacy.
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