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Speculative realism


Gord Barentsen
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  • 1 month later...

So embarrassed I didn't see this before - 1000.13123 apologies :wry:

I'm still very new to speculative realism.  Seems they disagree with each other just like any other area in philosophy, but the one thing you can say of all of them is that they reject the tradition in Western philosophical thought that equates (correlates) human thought with Being.  So you have Hegel, who (AFAIK) says that existence unfolds according to the logic of dialectical thinking, which means that  whatever we call the absolute can be known by human thought, because, well, they are ultimately identical or have the same "accesibility."

So the self-evident part is the belief that reality is self-evident, that objects and such are simply "right there" for us to gain full knowledge of.  That their "reality" is not in need of dispute.

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We need to teach children how to think rather than what to think. – Margaret Mead

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Thanks for that!  I've been lurking about speculative realism's margins for a while now, convinced that it should be dialogued with Jung.  I've started reading Peter Gratton's Speculative Realism: Problems and Prospects.

When a book and a head collide and a hollow sound is heard, must it always have come from the book? -- Lichtenberg

 

 

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On 2/13/2017 at 11:51 AM, stimmung79 said:

so how is it?  are you going to post a review?

Not sure...right now I don't feel confident in my knowledge of SR to review any of its texts.  All I could do is noob-review it.  It makes me want to go off and read Meillassoux (although someone else told me that way lies madness), and Grant's Philosophies of Nature After Schelling has been on my to-read list for a loooong time.

What I can say right now is that it's quite accessible and the footnotes are well worth looking at because they refer to a lot of different texts of any given author that explore different dimensions of their thought.

When a book and a head collide and a hollow sound is heard, must it always have come from the book? -- Lichtenberg

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 2/14/2017 at 4:00 PM, Gord Barentsen said:

What I can say right now is that it's quite accessible and the footnotes are well worth looking at because they refer to a lot of different texts of any given author that explore different dimensions of their thought.

So you would recommend this yeah?  Does it have a good bibliography?

We need to teach children how to think rather than what to think. – Margaret Mead

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2 minutes ago, NotWithoutMyOntic said:

So you would recommend this yeah?  Does it have a good bibliography?

I think it does.  Following citations in the chapter notes is sometimes a little difficult, but it doesn't really affect the discussions.

When a book and a head collide and a hollow sound is heard, must it always have come from the book? -- Lichtenberg

 

 

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