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grammatology?


chacheng
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If it is possible to explain it briefly (I don't have much timehere right now), I understand that grammatology is about writing and difference.  I know Derrida tries to get rid of the distinction between speech and writing (because Western philosophy privileges speech over writing), so I think that's the basis of grammatology?

I'm not as familiar with Derrida as I should be, as I find him somewhat irritating.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry chacheng...meant to reply to this before.

First, what do you have to read?  I assume parts of Derrida's Of Grammatology, but the idea of a grammatology pops up in different terms throughout his work.  Very briefly for now: Like @stimmung79 says, in OG Derrida takes issue with the idea that speech and writing are two different things (and that speech is somehow more authentic than writing).  Essentially, he argues that writing (écriture) is fundamental and comes before everything, and that the privileging of the voice over writing (e.g., the voice of God, the voice of the poet etc) is part of the tradition of Western ontotheology.[1]  So very briefly, Derrida argues that there is a constitute difference to Being which is reflected in writing.

It might be helpful to juxtapose grammatology with grammar: a grammar is a set of rules which conceptualize and organize a language (or, importantly, a science); what Derrida calls a grammatology is intended to be "a science of the possibility of science,"[2] a science of how sciences organize themselves out of this writing.  Or, how "grammatology" congeals into "grammar."

Make sense?

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Ontotheology" being a Heideggerian term taken up by Derrida to indicate the tradition of seeing beings as self-present.
  2. ^ Jacques Derrida, Of Grammatology, trans. Spivak, corr. ed. (JHUP, 1997), 27.

When a book and a head collide and a hollow sound is heard, must it always have come from the book? -- Lichtenberg

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/13/2017 at 11:28 AM, stimmung79 said:

but is this writing just an endless flow of words or sounds or whatnot?  both?  and if it's just endless how do sciences happen then?

I think that's tantamount to the question of where the person comes from....cos it's the person who creates science.  So where is the subject in écriture?

When a book and a head collide and a hollow sound is heard, must it always have come from the book? -- Lichtenberg

 

 

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